Natural Resources, Environmental Science & Conservation

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You are viewing a static copy of the 2013 Sunriver Conference website archived on December 11, 2013. To view current Northwest GIS User Group events and news visit nwgis.org.

GIS Applications for Remediation of Military Munitions Sites

Military munitions and related constituents on both active and retired installations represent a principal environmental, health, and safety issue on millions of acres of public and formerly publicly owned land. Due to the large cost associated with traditional "Mag and Flag" Ordnance and Disposal operations, technologies such as LiDAR and Orthophotography, Digital Geophysical Mapping (Helicopter and Ground based), X-Ray Fluorescence, and Synthetic Aperture Radar are utilized. Mr. Hille will discuss the central role the GIS plays in the management, deployment, and implementation of these technologies to provide for a cleaner safer environment.

Presenter(s): 
Peter Hille, Bryan Hosford
Biography: 

Mr. Hille has worked on remediation issues for military bases since 2002. He is currently the GIS manager for the munitions remediation group at HDR Environmental, Operations and Construction, Inc. Mr. Hille has a particular interest in applying LiDAR and GIS to the Geophysical domain. When not applying geospatial thinking to remediation projects, Peter can be seen heading out the door in pursuit of morel mushrooms and other fun in the mountains of Southern Oregon.

Room: 
Landmark 1
When: 
October 17, 2013 - 4:00pm - 4:30pm
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GIS and Remote Sensing Technologies for Military Munitions Remediation

Military munitions and related constituents on both active and retired installations represent a principal environmental, health, and safety issue on millions of acres of public and formerly publicly owned land. Due to the large cost associated with traditional "Mag and Flag" Ordnance and Disposal operations, technologies such as LiDAR and Orthophotography, Digital Geophysical Mapping (Helicopter and Ground based), X-Ray Fluorescence, and Synthetic Aperture Radar are utilized. Mr. Hille will discuss the central role the GIS plays in the management, deployment, and implementation of these technologies to provide for a cleaner safer environment.

Presenter(s): 
Peter Hille,GISP
Biography: 

Mr. Hille has worked on remediation issues for military bases since 2002. He is currently the GIS manager for the munitions remediation group at HDR Environmental, Operations and Construction, Inc. Mr. Hille has a particular interest in applying LiDAR and GIS to the Geophysical domain. When not applying geospatial thinking to remediation projects, Peter can be seen heading out the door in pursuit of morel mushrooms and other fun in the mountains of Southern Oregon.

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Landscape-scale Assessments of Biodiversity for Informing Conservation

Conservation of biodiversity relies on having spatial data, such as predictive species distribution models and protected areas layers, that can inform conservation prioritization across the US. Nationwide species distribution models for amphibians, birds, mammals, and reptiles are currently being developed, using a standardized and consistent methodology. We have begun a national biodiversity assessment that identifies how much of each species’ distribution occurs on lands managed for biodiversity and what agencies manage those lands, based on USGS-GAP’s Protected Areas Database of the US (PAD-US). Land managers, researchers, decision makers, and the general public can use this information to evaluate the efficacy of conservation strategies or to identify critical habitat. We maintain a database that can provide these data for each species by state, county, and Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC). These data will help to prioritize conservation efforts in the US by providing landscape-scale assessments of biodiversity.

Presenter(s): 
Thomas Laxson
Biography: 

Thomas Laxson is a GIS Analyst with the Gap Analysis Program, Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

Room: 
Landmark 1
When: 
October 17, 2013 - 3:30pm - 4:00pm
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Quantifying Watershed Susceptibility for Source Water Protection - A GIS Approach

The Joint Water Commission (JWC) is a collective water supply agency and a primary drinking water supplier in Washington County, Oregon. The JWC’s 228 square mile watershed includes portions of the Tualatin River and Trask River basins. One of the main goals of the JWC’s source water protection efforts is to safeguard drinking water quality by evaluating potential contamination risks within the JWC’s watershed and participating in programs to minimize those risks. The JWC selected GSI Water Solutions to build a source water protection-specific geodatabase and perform specific GIS analysis that would help to quantify potential contamination risks and sensitivity of lands to contamination. GSI was tasked with gathering up-to-date GIS data from various sources that would help to model risk and sensitivity. Once the GIS data was imported into the geodatabase, a risk analysis and a sensitivity analysis were performed. The risk analysis incorporated GIS data related to pesticide applications, agricultural fertilizer applications, potential hazardous contaminant sources, septic tank locations, areas of urban development, and proximity to public roads and railroads. The sensitivity analysis incorporated GIS data related to flood zones, forestry activities, surface water time of travel zones, unstable/vulnerable soils, wetlands, and proximity to surface water. While each of the GIS data used in the risk and sensitivity analysis were informative individually, additional insights about overall risk/sensitivity within the JWC watershed was found by combining the GIS data using the weighted sum geoprocessing method. To accomplish this, GSI worked with the JWC to determine numeric risk/sensitivity rankings and weights of significance to the overall analysis for each layer. Once the rankings and weights determined, GSI used the weighted sum geoprocessing tool in Spatial Analyst to combine the layers to create an integrated, comprehensive view of both risk and sensitivity of lands within the JWC’s watershed. The output of the risk and sensitivity analysis quantified the susceptibility of any location within the JWC’s watershed to contamination based on multiple layers of input. Once watershed susceptibility was quantified, the JWC can better focus program development (saving time and money) to minimize the potential impacts from chemical or biological pollutants. Jesse Manley GSI Water Solutions 55 SW Yamhill St, Suite 300 Portland, OR 97204 503-729-2222 jmanley@gsiws.com

Presenter(s): 
Jesse Manley
Biography: 

Jesse Manley is the GIS manager for GSI Water Solutions in Portland, Oregon. Jesse has been a professional GIS specialist since 2001 and he specializes in GIS solutions for renewable energy, geology, groundwater, water resources, and environmental management. Jesse has been on the NWGIS board of directors since October of 2010 and is co-chair of the 2013 NWGIS Sunriver conference.

Room: 
Landmark 1
When: 
October 17, 2013 - 11:30am - 12:00pm
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Oregon Wildfire GIS Support 2013

The 2013 fire season for the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) was one of the worst for the state in several years. Fire fighting efforts are highly dependent on accurate and timely production of hardcopy maps, spatial data, and online data applications. This presentation will summarize the 2013 fire season, the GIS workflow needed to get maps in the hands of fire fighters, sharing data and information with stakeholders, and an outlook for future innovations.

Presenter(s): 
Emmor Nile + ODF GIS Staff
Biography: 

Emmor Nile (GISP) has been the GIS Coordinator for the Oregon Department of Forestry since 1995.

Room: 
Landmark 1
When: 
October 17, 2013 - 2:30pm - 3:00pm
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